About your Search

20091101
20091130
SHOW
Today 22
( more )
STATION
FOXNEWS 96
CSPAN 48
CNN 36
WHUT (Howard University Television) 35
HLN 32
WMPT (PBS) 27
WETA 26
WRC (NBC) 25
WBAL (NBC) 18
MSNBC 14
CSPAN2 10
WJLA (ABC) 8
WMAR (ABC) 8
WUSA (CBS) 8
WJZ (CBS) 5
CNBC 4
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 405
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 405 (some duplicates have been removed)
in terms of moral absolutes with the united states being an absolute good. this contributes to the fourth issue, which is missing blowback. and fifth and finally, i don't think you talked about this as much, a belief that speedy change to political regime social security both desirable and possible. so i guess the question i have for you is if we follow's john's argument the cold war was a farce, does that invalidate these lessons? does it validate the lessons learned or mislearned? particular on the at the scream change, i realize it's a draft you mentioned in passing, i was quite interested to know in passing, you mention regime change as a possible outcome. in other words, you talk about it as being quite feasible tv a long-term commitment so. in other words, you talk about regime change as something that is quite possible to achieve, it just wasn't done properly recently. is that your view, and if so, how does one achieve regime change? and then the questions that came from on high via the internet ether is who would apply the same critique of faulty lessons to the bush 41 or clinton
people, including ethnic and religious minority, whether they are in the united states, china or any nation. >> but even as the president called for access to information, china was tightly controllg it. the meeting with a carefully screened group of students who were coached beforehand was not broadcast live across the country, and while it was available on two big national internet sites, it was hard to hear. and one big website, the xinhua news agency told people that the obamauñ÷ live, but then on the screen apparently fails to deliver on that promise. in tonight's "lead focus," we take an in depth look at the obama visit and its significance, beginning with the presidents day from melissa chan of al jazeera english. >> reporter: the president is now in beijing, but earlier in the day, he was in shanghai for his town hall meeting. it's the favorite format for the american president, a conversation with the people, talking about u.s./china relations. >> our world is now fundamentally interconnected. the jobs we do, the prosperity we build, the environment we protect, the securit
. but tonight, the question will be what our esteemed analysts think about the future of the united states as we stand here at the end of 2009. we really have an extraordinary group of panelists. let me just share their introduction so everyone knows who they are. i have learned that people like introductions. certainly, i like it louise gives me that wonderful introduction. we will first hear from richard haas, counsel for relations, who has worked with two presidents. as council president, he has truly been an entrepreneurial leader. it has always been important, but richard has he brought many scholars and expertise and wide range of subjects. his most recent book is called a " war of necessity, war of joyce," -- "war of necessity, war of choice." glenn hubbard is no ordinary academic. he is dean of columbia business and a tenured professor of finance and economics at the columbia school of arts and sciences. he has worked for the treasury and as a consultant to the federal reserve bank, and recently he wrote a book called "healthy, wealthy, and wise -- five steps to better health care system
emigrating to the united states. it was a great magnet for talent for canada. i came and went to graduate school in the united states. ended up owing $500 to my law school and i had like a -year-old chevrolet and had a wonderful experience in this country. it is open in many ways, that are so unique to this country and to this culture and it was pacific northwestly clear to me why anybody with energy and talent would want to move here, because of the opportunities that were created not just in terms of economic opportunities but just in general. -- perfectly clear to me why anybody with energy and would want want to move here. it was much less -- there is much less prejudice in this society. merit and talent was a much more important quotient but have i to say that despite all of this experience that would have and has made me very optimistic on so many levels, i have developed an increasing sense of pessimism about where we are going in the future. future. . re ng in the future. the main reason for that, frankly, is the propensity of the american system now to produce weekly -- leadershi
. the prime minister yesterday visited a joint united states/israeli missile defense maneuver. there th're preparing for all eventualities. rocket and missile attacks on israel from iran, syria are lebanon and gaza. >> the threat is new and the fact is our forces are being prepared to give a new response. >> the new response is the iron dome anti-missile system. it will be deployed in less than a year. but the fact that remains is from now on, in any future israeli conflict, from the north or the south, the heart of the nation tel aviv will be under threat. >>> today in milan, italy, there >>> today in milan, italy, there was a landmark court ruling regarding a program run by the central intelligence agency known as extraordinary renditn. under that program, terror suspects were secretly detained and flowto foreign countries for interrogations that some have described as torture. today an italian judge convicted 23 americans of kidnapping an egyptian cleric from a milan street in 2003 in one such operation. the cia has declined to comment on the case and all of the americans were tried
the united states and cuba. a key congressional committee is discussing lifting the ban on americans traveling to cuba. could the embargo fall next? we talk to the committee chairman and to a leading human rights advocate with a scathing report on cuba. plus, differing viewpoints from two officials who have just returned from there. >>> but first, cnn's nick robinson reports on the new robotic warfare over afghanistan and pakistan. it's conducted from thousands of miles away in suburban america. >> reporter: look around this room. it's been hit by a missile fired from an unmanned aerial vehicle, a uav, more commonly known as a drone. the family living here say children were killed in this u.s. attack. the children were never the target, but in pakistan's tribal border region, the death spelled trouble for u.s. foreign policy. where many believe that fighting with drones is cowardly. >> last year, one of the most popular songs in pakistani pop culture was a song whose lyrics talked about how america fights without honor. >> reporter: launched from just over the border in afghanistan,
that the future of the united states and asia is inextricably linked. >> president obama is in asia threw next week with stops in tokyo, singapore, shanghai, beijing. so who get as the lion's share of obama's time? china. three days out of nine replicating what happened recently at the u.n. where the president of china and president obama were closeted for 90 minutes. this time allocation speaks for itself. and if there is any doubt remaining, obama's description of the u.s./chinese relationship clears it up. >> the relationship between the united states and china will shape the 21st century, which makes it as important bilateral relationship in the world. >> question. what must president obama accomplish in china this coming week? pat? >> he'll have to rebalance the trade relationship between the united states and china. the last ten years, the chinese have had a $2 trillion surplus. we've experted to them jobs, factories, money, technology, and that's one of the reasons why we've got this financial crisis and the dollar's in such trouble. what he's got to do is convince the chinese that this
of the world is, the united states and through president obama to announce our intentions and our way forward. but they have a deep understanding of why this is important for nato, why this is important for the larger international community. and i think that given the right measures of accountability that we need to be seeking from president karzai and his government, we're going to see a commitment not just from germany but from many of our nato allies. >> rose: might they make up whatever the gap is between what general mcchrystal is seeking and what the united states is prepared to provide in terms of troops? >> well, i think we have to wait for the president's announcement. but we will be, as we have been, consulting very deeply our allies and talking about what we want to see from them in order to have this integrated military and civilian strategy. because, remember it's not just about troops on the ground, it's about making sure that the people of afghanistan see the results of this effort. that they have more faith in their own government as of... as an entity that can deliver for th
chief for "alternate." will also talk with a guest about the united states effort to resolve longstanding difference between israelis and palestinians. also note tim brown of the 9/11 network coalition. he will be here to talk was about the december 5 rally in new york against bernanke 9/11 suspects to a federal courthouse in lower manhattan. . . american icons, continues tonight at 8:00 p.m., with the history, art and architecture of the most symbolic structures, tonight at 8:00 p.m. on c-span and get your own copy of american icons, a three-disk set, $24.95. order on-line at c-span.org/store. now a look back at cuban missile crisis, with kennedy advisors ted sornson and carol kasem. from the kennedy library in boston, this is an hour and 15 minutes. this war policy was done in secret and steps were taken to deceive us by every means they could. they were planning in november to open to the world the fact that they had these missiles so close to the united states, not that they are with intending to fire them, because if they were going to get into a niewg clear struggle, th
. one country's success need not co at the expense of another. that is why the united states insists we do not seek to contn china's rise. on the contrary, we welcome ina as a stron and prosperous and sucssful member o the community of nations. >> reporter: answering a qution on internet access ina -- >> unrestcted internet access a source ofrength, and i thinshould be encouraged. i think that the morereely formation flows, the stronger the society beces because tn citizens of countries around the world can hold their own governmes accountable. ey can begin tohink for themselves that generates new ideas. >> reporter: and disssing cooperation on climate change -- >> the united stat and china are th world's two larst emitters of greenhous ges, of carbon that is causing the planet to warm. so unls both of ou countries are willg to take critical steps in dealing with this issue, we wil not be able to resolve it. >> reporter: there's no down china d the u.s. wil be v to workogether on a variety of world problems, but don't expect any major announcements fro this visit. after shangi, the pres
, the answer is i would probably start with something different from what we have in the united states. there is a wonderful book out there called "the healing of america," by a washington post reporter. what we have in the united states is an amalgam of the worst, that just about all of the system that you talked about, we have a little bit from this one, a little bit bad from this one, etc. so you end up with something that cims it is the best health care in the world when the statistics say it is pretty pathetic, the quality of health care and united states. >> you are saying the medicine is pathetic, so what about care? >> the medicine is pathetic, the results are pathetic. and the costs are exorbitant. >> that is very depressing. >> what happens then is that it gets demagogued to death. that is what we're seeing right now. the old things that scare people into tea parties, and from the left, things that are unrealistic. you end up in the same state of political paralysis, and the united states gets into deeper trouble providing something that should be a fundamental right in this
's meetg, "the new york tis" noted e range of issues on whic the united state was asking for china's help. somethinthat might have been thinkable, it sa,efore the united states became embroiled in two wars a bfore the u. onomy was hbbled bythe global financialrisis that began on ishores. those issu inclu the wde trade ga between the two countries, redung greenhouse gas emiions, as well as iran and its nuclear program. prident obama alsobrgh up with the dai lama,he a exiled leader of tibet. beyond a show of goodill and a prome to work o big issues, no breakthrous were reported. but in tonight's "leadfocus," we wt to show you how the issue was cvered by theenglish language cnnel of chinese ate television. >> reporter: presint hu jintao has met with barack obama in beijing. they haveledged fortronger cooperion and to findore mm ground deite their differces. their discusons also focused on global challengesndhe wod economy has a solid recove. >> ts is the third formal meetingetween pesident ji andao barack obama this year th the interests of e world'sargesteveloping and develed nations. the t
of the world's challenges cannot be solved unless the united states and china work together rts. >> reporter: but there was another challenge, how to address china's record on human rights. the president broached the topic at a town hall meeting with university students in shanghai earlier in the day. >> we do not seek to impose any system of government on any other nation. but we also don't believe that the principless that we stand for are unique to our nation. these freedoms of expression and worship, of access to information and political participation, we believe, are universal rights. they should be available to all people, including ethnic and religious minorities whether they are in the united states, china or any nation. >> reporter: following past practice for such events chinese authorities detained dozens of human rights activists in advance of the president's visit. mr. obama did not mention the crackdown but he did chide the chinese government for internet censorship. china has 250 million internet users but also employs the world's tightest controls over web access. >> i am a
of the international community but fully engage with the international community and the united states is the one who can do the heavy lifting. there is no question about that. >> rose: and john harris of politiceau.com gives us a one-year analysis of the oa administration. >> the idea that president obama and his team were able to somehow transform the map and transform the political geography of this country or the political demography of this country, that just doesn't look to be the case. they did redraw the map in 2008. it was an he norly impressive victory. but that doesn't mean that they have somehow fundamentally altered the landscape in permanent ways. >> and job grisham is here with a new book, a collection of short stories. >> it is more about people. more about the small town people. many of whom are struggling. many of whom have had a lot of miss erie, a lot of hope. it's about small town lawyers and the crazy things they do out of desperation. all stuff i saw firsthand many years ago. >> rose: mohamed elbaradei, john harris, john grisham next. >> funding for charlie rose has been provid
>>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show wan exclusive interview with maziar bahari "the newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he's written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new deli where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmolian singh. let's get started. everyone has forgotten you, those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confine in the an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek" he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to $300,000 american dollars. he flew back to his home in london just days before his wife paola ga
square. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you this week from london. we begin the show with an exclusive interview with maziar bahari, the "newsweek" reporter who spent four months in an iranian prison. he has written about it in this week's "newsweek." he has a harrowing, moving tale to tell. and then the main event. i'm just back from new delhi where i spoke with the prime minister of india manmohan singh. in his only television interview on his trip to washington, d.c. let's get started. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> everyone has forgotten you. those were words maziar bahari heard every day from interrogators during the four months he spent in solitary confinement in an iranian prison. maziar is my colleague, a fine journalist who works for "newsweek." he's also an award-winning filmmaker. he was arrested along with hundreds of others during the protests that followed iran's disputed election. the end of his ordeal came in october when he was released on bail of $3 billion reales, equal to 300,000 american d
with the united states both economic and security. the obama administration really doesn't want to revisit all of that, but president obama said on the record he understand that a new party coming to power will want to take a look at all the underlying agreements negotiated with the united states by the liberal democratic party. the big issues that will be on the table between these two leaders -- climate change, north korea, and trade. one other issue, of course, is afghanistan with the democratic party of japan came in, the prime minister decided to end a long-standing refueling operation the japanese were conducting with vessels in the indian ocean. but in exchange, the japanese government has put up funds in reconstruction aid. botin the main, this summit, the second time the two leaders have met is not going to produce any new u.s.-japanese announcement on any of the issues i discussed but it will be an opportunity for the two to discuss trade, north korea and climate change. steve: major, just a moment ago the white house office of the press secretary released something. apparently the u
years between iran and the united states in geneva last month. he is now involved in the draft agreement between iran, the united states, russia and france to process iran's uranium stockpiles outside the country. there are reports today that progress on the deal is being held up by iran's ongoing internal political crisis. this week dr. elbaradei called the current mont a unique and fleeting opportunity to reverse course from confrontation to cooperation with iran. we want to talk about all of that and i am very pleased to have him back at this table. welcome. >> charlie, it is great to be here again. >> rose: all right. let me just start. tell me where you think the moment is. >> well, the moment is a historic critical moment, charlie, that this is for the first time i see a genuine desire by the president of the united states and by the iranian leadership to engage in a genuine dialogue. it's after 50 years of animosity, of distrust. and that's why we have this difficulty today. the it is a symbolic gesture but it could be the first step in a broad dialogue that eventually could integ
they could actually make a difference with the ballot. >> the united states needs to say to the world we have to solve the problem of our continuing confrontation with the muslim world it has undermined the success of president after president. and we cannot continue that way. we have to find a way to overcome that barrier and therefore israel has to see itself in the context of the whole western alliance. >> rose: friedman, rogan, cohen next. >> funding for charlie rose has been provided by the following. >> each day a billion people won't find safe drinking water. around the world we're helping communitites to access clean water. working to improve lives through conservation and education. one drop at a time. >> additional funding for charlie rose was also provided by these funders. . >> and by bloomberg, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this was a big week in diplomacy for president oa. last night he returned from a week long visit to asia it took him to j
and shakers of the united states of america. that is why i am here. that is why i am doing this luncheon. i feel like -- the gratitude is out of this world right now for having me do this. it really quick, i want to thank everybody for this honor. i want to thank you for inviting me to speak. the recorders of the industry and all of the change agents, you, the press, has a very special responsibility, and that is to be a mirror for us to see ourselves, our community, our country, and the rest of the world, and a truly respect the rule that you play in our system. i am sure that many of you are asking why would i want to speak at the national press club in washington, d.c., and why would they invite me? i make my living by stringing together verses or playing a part in some movie or television series that you may all have seen, "law and order," by the way. what would ludacris have to say? what would i have to say about leadership? i am going to say a lot of different things, so take what i say a word for word. you wonder if i plan to run for office, maybe for president in 2012. you do not ha
would be investigated. this is one many flawed parts of the resolution. the united states will remain a true friend to our ally, israel. so let us call for an open and honest debate with the reputable justice goldstone. let us not act in haste to pass a resolution that in no way achieve our ultimate goal of achieving a lasting peace for israelis and palestinians. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from minnesota is recognized. mr. ellison: may i inquire as to the time remaining? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has one 3/4 minutes remaining. mr. ellison: i yield one minute to the gentleman from massachusetts. >> i ask permission to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> this resolution should not be coming before us. there is an anti-israel bias in the united nations, but it should be the responsibility of every member of this house to bring it back to the peace talk table. this resolution does not do that. this resolution heightens the rhetoric of division. regardless of what you think of the goldstone report, it makes an
. . every industrialized country has that system except the united states. we are going to change that. national polls show that the majority of doctors and the majority of americans favor a single payer system. that is why six months ago, we went to capitol hill. when senator baucus opened that first day of hearing in may, i stood up and said, excuse me, sir, why have you taken single payer off the table? why have you not allowed one doctor testify for single payer? baucus ordered us arrested. one by one, margaret, kevin, carol, and four others stood up and confronted baucus. and one by one we were all arrested and charged with disruption of congress. in a plea deal earlier this year, we agreed not to disrupt congress throughout the end of this year. since that day in may, baucus and harry reid in the senate, and nancy pelosi and steny hoyer in the house have cobbled together incomprehensible legislation. it is convoluted and confusing. but one thing is clear -- president obama and the democrats have cut a dirty deal with the health insurance and pharmaceutical industries. obama took
effect. a recent study by our national academy of sciences found that here in the united states burning fossil fuels leads to almost 120 billion dollars in health costs a year. most of those costs are premature deaths, and we know that the cost in human lives can be even higher in countries we merging economies that have fewer resources to improve air quality. for all of these reasons, president obama and i understand that we cannot wait any longer to act. president obama has made it clear that he's committed to passing comprehensive energy and climate legislation that will create millions of new jobs and secure clean energy sources that are made in america and work for america. but in the meantime, we're looking for ways that we can start reducing this threat right now. last friday i saw some of you at a white house stakeholder briefing i hosted with lisa jackson, the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefing we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area from funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to invest
service is enshrined in the constitution of the united states. we have a law that says the postal service should produce universal service. we have to maintain a basic service. host: joseph, independent caller. caller: one of the previous callers mentioned at the topic -- the vending machines. i look forward to going to the post office now with dread. one local post office has a giant hole in the wall covered with plywood where the vending machines used to be. when i asked one of the minister why they were gone. she said it was cost control. there's no way it can be more efficient to have all those people waiting in line. it makes no sense to me. there's something seriously wrong with the reasoning behind this kind of decision. i have seen it across the board. they're using space in the post offices for selling packages that have teddy bears and balloons on them. they should be sticking to basics, common-sense service. if i can avoid going to the post office, i will do it. they might as well -- it is just a nightmare. it is a baffling ordeal. guest: i am sorry to your use say that. you ar
in israel is likely to increase and the pressure from israel on the united states is very likely to increase. but we have seen in the past that there are precedents that the united states can prevent israel from taking military action, precisely because of the fact that israeli military action against iran would spell disaster for the united states in the region, which has been made very clear by admiral mullen, as well as other military figures in the u.s. so in the past we've seen examples in which the united states actually has successfully prevented israel from taking military action. >> thank you. >>> let's talk about the economy now. the chairman of the federal reserve goes before a senate committee this week as lawmakers consider a second term for ben bernanke. he's getting a headstart on the discussion with an opinion column in today's "washington post." bernanke argues against several moves under way in congress designed to limit the central bank's independence. bernanke's words, we should be seeking to preserve, not degrade, the institution's ability to foster financial stability a
to assume and they don't like having all the pressure brought on by the united states to ratchet up the level of chinese obligation. >> rose: also this evening, french chef eric ripert of the famous new york restaurant la bernadine. >> so when i came to new york, we're talking about 20 years ago. i came with a very french way of seeing food with a very strong mediterranean influence and then i discovered japanese cuisine. i discovered chinese cuisine, i went to brooklyn and visit the stores where they have all the spices. i traveled throughout the u.s. and interact with many other chefs from other cultures. i discovered south america. i went to japan. and all of that is ultimately digested and comes back in the kind of... i call that smart fusion. >> rose: a look at china and the united states in the after math of the presidential visit and food through the skills of eric ripert next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: this evening we continue our coverage of president obama's visit to china. earlier today he
visited a joint united states/israeli mssile defense mauver. therthey're preparing for all eventualities. rocket and missile attacks o israel from iran, syriare leban and gaza. >> thehreat is new and the fact is our foes are being prared to give a new respse. >> the new respons is the iron me anti-missilesystem. it will be dloyed in less than a year. but the fact that remains is fr now on, in any future israeli onflict, from the north or the south, the heart of the nation tel aviv wl be under thre. >>> today milan, aly, there was a landma court ruling regarding a program run by the centl intelligence agenc know as extraordinary ndition. under th program, terro suspects weresecretly detained and flown t foreign countrie for interrogation that sohave d. today an italian judge convicted 23 americans o kidnaing an egypan cleric from a milan street in 2003 in one such opation. the ciahas decned to comnt the case and all of the americs were tried in their absence. nevertheless, th judge immediely sentenced 22 ofhe americans toive years in jail. anotr american, the former cia station chiefin m
security interest of the united states. it is urgently needed. the president knows achieving this goal will be difficult, but he also has said that he will not waver in his persistent pursuit of a comprehensive peace in the middle east. for that reason, he has dedicated himself and his administration to the resumption of israeli-palestinian negotiations and the creation of an atmosphere that maximizes the prospects for success. . >> that is why we have been urged the palestinians to expand and improve their security effort, and to take strong and meaningful action. it is what we have an urged the arab states to take steps of normalization with israel. it is what we have urged israel to stop settlement activity. as i said earlier, while they fall short of a full freeze, we believe the steps announced by the prime minister are significant and could have substantial impact on the ground. for the first time ever the israeli government will stop housing approvals and on the construction of housing units. and related infrastructure in west bank settlements. that is positive development. he s
the last eight years united states has become cuba's principal food supply year and fifth largest trading partner, but americans cannot walk our streets or shop with our people. only recently we celebrated the 20th anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall. it should be recalled that the iron curtain started to open up by millions of westerners visiting the country's. we are grateful to the politicians who carried out the policy that helped create the conditions for this peaceful outcome. americans played a significant role. today you have a similar opportunity regarding cuba. we are aware of the concern of many distinguished congress women and men of the financial the impact of american tourism on the cuban economy, fearing that the civility of giving birth to the totalitarian regime we believe that many thousands of americans visiting cuba would benefit our society and enhance our people. firstly through the free flow of ideas and further asking the government to open up and provide goods and services such as renting rooms because the capacities in the hotels would be surpassed. it wou
to you first, what is the single biggest challenge for the president of the united states when he speaks to the united states, ed rollins? >> how long we're going to be there and equally as important what is the mission and how is the mission different than it was two years ago or four years ago. dechl democrats have to be convinced the president's party is very divided on this issue. i think he'll have the republican support he needs, but at the end of day, if this is not a bipartisan effort long-term they won't get the resources and funding to make it work. >> donna brazile, to ed rollins' point, the toughest sales job is the anti-war left of the democratic party. how does the president convince them to support him or keep quiet of the criticism? >> public support of the war has diminished across the board not just with the left, across the country and even across the world where we depend on troops from other countries to help us in afghanistan. the president gave a very thorough speech back in march, laying out our objectives. he said it was to dismantle, disrupt and destroy al qaeda
of the united states to take a look at your antitrust exemption. york $8 billion organization has not taken seriously responsibility to the players. a fact of the matter is, if yes, people want to play. they are going to be injured and we know that no matter what kind of helmet you build, no matter what kind of equipment that you have, it is a dangerous sport. people are going to be injured. the only question is, what you going to do -- are you going to pay the injured player and their family for the injuries that they have received and how can you be a multi-billion operation? se profits, but i think the responsibility of this congress is to take a look at that anti--trust exemption that you have. in my estimation, take it away. i yield back the balance of my time. >> i thank the gentlewoman for her modest suggestions. [laughter] the chair recognizes howard from north carolina. >> thank you, mr. chairman. what does the alumni association have to say to active pro, college and high school players about the importance of early and completely presenting to team physicians any sims that may ha
telling the president of the united states no, i don't even want olympia snowe, i'd want one republican supporting health care bill? >> the truth is -- i'm going to disagree right now. free enterprise does not work particularly well in health care and i will tell you why. the administration rate -- >> we don't have insurance companies competing across state lines 3 >> that's the worst thing you could do. >> are you kidding me? >> yes. i will explain why this is. in my state, everybody under 18 has health care. you cannot be refused by any insurance company, no matter what the reason is. everybody gets charged the same. you cannot charge a sick patient who is older more than 20% more than you can charge a young, healthy patient. that has been going on for 15 years. if you could let people buy insurance across state lines, you are making the texas health commissioner be my health commissioner. do you know what the insurance rate is in in texas? 25%. 22% of children have no health insurance in texas. i do not want health commissioner in texas to have anything to do with my health insurance
? >> it has been across the continental united states, and beyond. the associated press and newspapers in eight different states, big ones, like massachusetts, colorado, michigan, georgia, have all discovered wildly inflated or exaggerated claims. fox news has confirmed that these phantom districts have been included for at least nine other states, including nevada. where stimulus recipients made claims of jobs created on the behalf of the 25th district, even though only three districts exist. gregg: the white house is taking some heat from the democratic party on this. talk about that. >> true, the chairman of the house appropriations committee spoke with fox news moments ago telling us that the publication of false data will lead citizens to doubt the they know what the obama administration is doing. that led to a stinging statement last night, special assistant to the president on stimulus said this morning that -- gregg: james, thank you very much. one industry that is passing a big increase in jobs? solar power. the average solar energy company increased its payroll by 70% from 20
, it was six world powers that made a move today. delegates from the united states, britain, france, germany, russia and china met in brussels, belgium, and turned up the heat on iran. they didn't discuss the sanctions, not yet anyway, but that possibility served as a backdrop for today's meetings. the issue is iran's nuclear ambitions. tehran says its uranium enrichment program is for peaceful purposes only, but other countries worry it gives iran the capability of making an atomic bomb. despite some optimism in recent weeks, iran now seems to be rejecting a plan to have its uranium enriched outside the country. the delegates in brussels urged iran to reconsider, and hence the talk by president obama and others this week about the possibility of new sanctions. what kind of measures and when, that is our "lead focus" tonight. weeks after iran disclosed the existence of this once-secret nuclear facility near the holy city of qom, in brussels today representatives of the world's major powers pressed iran to accept a plan to curb its nuclear ambitions. the six countries released this statement
think if you add up the troops that the united states will commit as well as those that nato countries are going to commit and that's still a work in progress on the latter. i'm told by senior defense officials that general mcchrystal will be more or less satisfied with the number that he believes he needs to do the counterinsurgency campaign that he laid out in his strategic assessment earlier this year. >> suarez: now, it takes a while to get everybody deployed, doesn't it? >> it does. it will take several months, actually several weeks for the first troops. but the marines that you mentioned will be going in first early next year to be followed soon after by a number of... several hundred perhaps up to a thousand army trainers. these will be doing the initial training of afghan recruits. the recruits will then be put into their units and partnered with american units on the ground. this will be a phased deployment going over the next 12 to 18 months. the troops that you mention in your broadcast, up to some 30,000 or so will be phased in over that time frame. >> suarez: once all tho
, including ethnic and regious minorities whether they e in the united states, cha or any nation. >> reporte following past actice for such event chinese ahorities detained dozens of human rits activists in vance of the presint's visit. mr. obama did not menti the crackdown but did chide the chine government for internet nsorship. china has 250 milon intert users but also employs the wod's tightest controls over web accs. >> i am a g believer in technoloy. and i'm a big liever in openns when it comes to the flow of informatn. i think that the morereely inrmation flows, the stronger the socie becom. because then citizens of countries arounthe world can hold their own governments accountable. ey can begin to think for themselves. that generates new ids. it encouages creativit >>orter: the president suggesteds communist rulers shou have nothing to fear fr more openness. heited criticism he faces at home. >> the truth is that becau in the united states information is free d i have a lot of itics in the uted states who can say all kinds of things out me, i actually think th that makes o democrac
that we have had the highest deficit in the history of the united states, $1. trillion, -- the $1.4 trillion, the pelosi plan comes in weighing at $1 trillion. when we just got unemployment figures back, think about this, the president with an 8.5% unemployment rate pushes upon the congress a $787 billion stimulus bill and now unemployment has gone from 8.5% to 10.2% and in so many other pockets of america it's 14%, 15% and 16%. where are the jobs? why have we taken the focus off the main thing, the economy? why are we going down the track of government takeover of health care? and massive mandates on individuals, doctors and small businesses? just like china. mr. speaker, 1,900 pages, it's ridiculous. the republican alternative, which is not even half, not even 25%, but i'd say maybe 15% in size, weighing in at say maybe a mere $1 -- 150 pages, bring more competition for individuals, association health care plan to let small businesses pool together, expansion of health savings accounts, medical malpractice reform to reduce frivolous lawsuits. this is the republican alternative a
will also talk about the growth of islamic radicalism within the united states. all those topics and your calls, starting tomorrow at 7:00. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] . >> here is what is ahead. next, a look at the history of the atomic bomb. then a panel discussion on global security after the fall of the berlin wall. later, a review of the 2008 elections. saturday, a look back at the cuban missile crisis with former kennedy advisers ted sorensen and karaoke secret have war threats been over hyped in the post cold-war world? a university of virginia panel on how the political process has been affected by the internet. and facebook founder chris hughes on how social networking is changing the political process. this holiday weekend on c-span. >> on this vote, the yeahs are 60, the nays are 39. the motion is agreed to. >> with that vote, the senate moves the health care bill to the floor. starting monday and through december, follow the entire debate, and how the bill would affect access to medical care,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 405 (some duplicates have been removed)